Lesson 5!

De les was een grote success!

I had another really good session and I can honestly say I am really really enjoying myself. Our text for this week, Vocabulaire Tekst 4, was a lot longer than usual and I can confidently say I understood 70%+ and I got the gist of the passage. I think that is the key to my Dutch language learning, just get the gist and wing it. This week the text as about Anna. Anna didn’t like the colour of her bathroom door so decided she wanted to change it. A little patheitic I know but when its just shy of a full page and you can comfortably understand the gist and the majority of the words its all good and I am more than happy with it.

Vocabulary 5 consisted of diminutives, plurals and adjectives  (i’ll tag that in as soon as i get the copy off my tutor). Luckily I had covered them all previously at home and felt quite comfortable using them. I was also reminded of a little rule that will help with the current mistakes I am making. With adjectives if you are describing a noun you take the ‘e’ off the end. Here are a couple of examples:

De vrouw is mooi – De mooie vrouw

De man is sterk – De sterke man

Het is koud – De koude lucht

De trein was laat – De late trein

IMG_6082

For other English speakers I had never heard of this group of words either, its cool to not understand your own grammatical schemes most Dutch don’t apparently. Diminutives are words that signify a ‘little’ something. The Dutch do this way more than us English. I supposed one way to explain them in English like horse – horsey or dog – doggy (Personally I HATE this. Why parents choose to teach their children the words this way really really annoys me. As if learning to speak isn’t hard enough you teach a child for the first 3 or 4 years of its life to say “Oh look it’s a horsey” only to have to correct them and be like “Well actually I know you’ve just learnt to confidently communicate but I’m telling you you’re doing it all wrong and its time to start again”. Why do that to a child?!) In Dutch it is used much more and its more cute, I have no problem with this. Here are some examples of diminutives:

little door – deurtje

little boy – jongetje

little pot – potje

As a little side note too, all diminutives like these take ‘het’.

Multiples and plurals I’ve covered this to no end and its basically adding ‘en’ to the end of the word or ‘s’.

Women – vrouwen

Mirrors – spiegels

Pens – pennen

Shops – winkles

We learnt a few more useful sentences too, pleasantries that I am sure I have heard before that have been said to me and I’ve just nodded and smiled. Here’s a few for you that may come in useful:

Aangename kennis met u te maken – Pleasure to meet you (for formal occasions)

Leuk kennis met je te maken – Pleasure to meet you (for friends and informal occasions)

Another useful phrase: Ik begrip het niet – I don’t understand. Another not so useful but made us all have a little titter – de grote billen – the big bottom. Apparently the Dutch don’t distinguish buttcheeks therefore billen is infact a plural version of bil meaning buttock. Not exactly sure of how, when or if I’ll ever need to know that but hey, its only one extra word to remember. Je hebt een mooie billen!

We had small conversations with each other and asked and answered questions. In my little group we talked about a fireman. We where supposed to have a conversation with each other but we some how ended up just describing said fireman. I would share my notes on that but you can imagine the line a group of three women too. Here’s a snippet “hij is een beetje sportief en hij rijd en fiets”.

All in all it was a great lesson. I have lots of practicing and revising to do but its coming along well. With just 10 days to go before I am going to try out my new found Dutch I need all the practice I can get!

Blog Signature

 p.s. I have written this blog post whilst watching Sex And The City fully subtitled in Nederlands!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s